New research tie-up to enhance canola in Australia

By Jane Byrne contact

- Last updated on GMT

Pacific Seeds and CSIRO representatives at the 2021 Wallendbeen NSW Hyola TD winter performance and hybrid phenology trials © Pacific Seeds
Pacific Seeds and CSIRO representatives at the 2021 Wallendbeen NSW Hyola TD winter performance and hybrid phenology trials © Pacific Seeds

Related tags: Canola, Australia, Animal health

Australian seed provider, Pacific Seeds, and government agency, CSIRO, have joined forces on a new three-year AUS$250K (US$194,245) research project set to better tailor canola hybrids and crop management to regional Australia’s variable growing conditions.

“This research will help us to jointly develop a world-first interactive decision-making tool for canola variety selection, dedicated time of sowing advice along with grazing advice, applied crop nutrition agronomy and animal health recommendations,”​ said Dr Julianne Lilley, CSIRO group leader, mixed farming innovations.

Initially the project will collate, review, and organize existing information and identify any knowledge gaps across the industry.

“In its first year, the project will conduct highly detailed phenology trials with three time of sowing events at four locations across Australia involving industry, growers, agronomists, and advisors,”​ Dr Lilley said.

“We’re excited to partner with CSIRO to further investigate and explore canola phenology and applied agronomy across major Australian canola growing environments,”​ said Pacific Seeds national canola technical manager, Justin Kudnig. 

The partnership follows on from work last season with CSIRO, farmers and local agronomists which saw Pacific Seeds’ Hyola 970CL product combined with science-based agronomic management to set a new Australian canola yield record of 7.16t/ha.

As this project progresses, it is expected to lead to further expansion of winter canola growing areas, said the teams.

“This project is another example of the importance of collaboration between complementary organizations, researchers, and growers to develop systems that drive efficiency, sustainability and ultimately profit for Australia’s agricultural industry,”​ said Kudnig.

Related topics: Australia, Oilseeds, R&D

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